Residents

Chief Residents 2018-2019

Nicole Mushero

Nicole Mushero

I grew up in Norwich, CT and moved to Massachusetts to attend Boston University for college. Following that, I obtained my Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Brandeis University. Over the course of my graduate work I came to realize that the lab was not where I wanted to be spending my time and that I really wanted to interact with people in a meaningful and direct way and decided to make the switch to medicine. I attended UMass Medical School and during third year was inspired by an amazing resident to pursue Internal Medicine because of the impression I could see him make on patients’ life and care. I realized, though, that I wanted the continuity of care in patient relationships that primary care provided. My interests within primary care include women’s health, healthcare disparities and geriatrics and I look forward to figuring out which avenues I will pursue. Another passion of mine is the use of reflective writing in medicine as a tool of learning and professional development and I look forward to being part of a community where such pursuits are valued. Outside of medicine, I enjoy spending time with my wife gardening, baking, and reading for pleasure.

Sarah Stoneking

Sarah Stoneking

I grew up in Greensboro, NC, with three fabulous sisters. I attended UNC-Chapel Hill for college, where I studied Chemistry, Music, and Anthropology. While in Chapel Hill, I became involved with The Jackson Center for Saving and Making History, a collective of neighbors, students, and friends who listened, through oral histories and time spent together, to the wisdom and concerns of the long-time residents of the historic Northside community of Chapel Hill. Through my time working with The Jackson Center, I became interested in oral histories as the grounding for community activism. I then moved to Memphis, TN, where I worked for The Church Health Center, a faith-based community health center. Both at The Jackson Center and The Church Health Center, I got the chance to see how incredible communities of care were founded and formed by the communities themselves. I returned to UNC for medical school, where I continued to fall in love with primary care and general medicine as a powerful means to work with the communities we live in. I am so pumped to be at CHA for the coming years and to be with a group of folks dedicated to rigorous academic medicine that prioritizes thoughtful care for the underserved. In my spare time, I enjoy spending time with my partner Will, my aforementioned fabulous sisters and friends, running and hiking, reading, and playing music.


Third Year Residents

Lynn Anderson

Lynn Anderson

I was born and raised in Alaska, the oldest of five, and am now the proud aunt of six. I attended Brigham Young University where I studied physiology and music. When I took a break to serve a mission for my church in the Bay Area and learned Spanish, I fell in love with the language and the diverse culture and people. I eventually found myself working as a Spanish medical interpreter with Intermountain Healthcare, which attuned me to gaps in understanding between physicians and patients, and to my potential in patient advocacy, particularly through continuity and collaboration. I also learned, through working at a volunteer clinic in Provo, Utah, how gaps in access were being addressed by a collaboration of local government, church, and community resources. I then attended the University of Washington School of Medicine, where my interest in primary care blossomed as a passion, particularly in working with immigrant and homeless populations. I was thrilled to discover this same deep-seated commitment to the underserved at CHA, and I am delighted to be joining the ranks. I love biking, hiking, watercolor, eating out, aunt-time over facetime, and making people cringe when I say: “the more snow the better.”

Vikas Gampa

Vikas Gampa

I was born in India, but grew up primarily in New Zealand and the most exotic Dayton, Ohio. I attended The Ohio State University, where I majored in Philosophy and Molecular Genetics. Following college, I volunteered through AmeriCorps VISTA at a pediatric ID clinic in the Bronx and I partnered with incredible community members to improve HIV research protocols. At Harvard Medical School, I explored ethical concepts of trust and patient autonomy among residents in a public hospital in Mumbai, with the intention to identify barriers to patient autonomy. After third year, I moved to New Mexico to work with Navajo community members on research training and to conduct qualitative research on community health worker-patient relationships. While on Navajo, I also worked with a group of dedicated activists and was inspired by the community’s resiliency. I understood the importance of primary care in improving the health of indigenous and underserved communities. At CHA, I look forward to working with a community dedicated to providing care to the underserved.

I enjoy cooking (and eating) large meals, riding my bike, and dancing with my partner, Krupa!

Shirin Karimi

Shirin Karimi

Originally from Madison, Connecticut, I got to experience a dynamic college experience as a Literature major at American University in Washington D.C. I served as an editor for BleakHouse Publishing, a press dedicated to using the arts to showcase the humanity overlooked in the incarcerated population. As a volunteer in a pediatric cancer ward, I was intrigued by the sentiments of cancer patients and their caregivers, whose descriptions of isolation in the hospital echoed the loss of identity and entrapment within a prison cell. From this experience, I was fortunate to publish an original book of poetry, taking on the voices of those imprisoned in the justice system and in the shackles of illness. I returned to my home state to attend the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, and delved into my passion for the medical humanities through the Arnold P. Gold Humanism Honor Society, research in cancer screening and immunotherapy, and serving the homeless population of Hartford as a member of the Board of our school-run medical clinic. Outside of school, I love traveling, art exhibits and theater, and exploring a new city with friends. I’m thrilled to join my future colleagues at CHA who are dedicated to using medicine as an avenue for social justice.

Gina Kim

Gina Kim

I grew up in sunny, Los Angeles, CA and moved to NYC to attend Columbia where I studied Neuroscience and Behavior. After college, I worked as a case manager for a welfare-to-work program, connecting individuals with resources to help overcome health and socioeconomic barriers. As a result of this work, I became interested in health disparities and wanted to gain more insight into the challenges of healthcare delivery for underserved populations, which led me to study health policy at the Mailman School of Public Health. For the next few years after graduate school, I worked at the Greater NY Hospital Association within the quality and patient safety department, managing various projects on perinatal safety and hospital-acquired infections. Inspired by the clinical experts I worked with at GNYHA, I eventually attended Albert Einstein College of Medicine. While at Einstein, I had amazing opportunities to volunteer in a public clinic in Cusco, Peru and a district hospital in Kisoro, Uganda, which confirmed my interests in providing care to and working with vulnerable populations. I hope to continue this work both within the local community and abroad, particularly focusing on access-to-care issues and quality. In my free time, I enjoy spending time with my husband and our English bulldog, Winston (meaning, mostly eating). I also enjoy cooking, reading in cafes, playing sports, hiking, and traveling.

Deborah Lee

Deborah Lee

I grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and Seoul, Korea. Initially, it was the meaningful relationships I gained while volunteering in a nursing home that attracted me to medicine. It moved me to see how individuals and families from all walks of life shared common vulnerabilities when their health and social circumstances led them to this setting. More importantly, these elders challenged me to learn more about the various medical and social factors that shape their lives at this stage. I attended Brown University for both college and medical school, as part of the Program in Liberal Medical Education. At Brown, I was blessed with incredible mentors in aging research, particularly regarding costs and quality of hospice care. At Brown, I also had the opportunity to interact with the diverse refugee populations in Rhode Island. At CHA, I hope to further grow in my clinical interests in both geriatrics and refugee health. I’m so grateful to train at CHA, where I’ll be surrounded by many role models - people I want to be when I (further) grow up! I love foreign languages, classical and worship music, independent films, and spending time with my loving family.

Kira Mengistu

Kira Mengistu

Having spent my early years in Belarus and Ethiopia, my parents and I immigrated to the United States when I was in grade school. I attended Harvard for college, where I studied Human Evolutionary Biology, Global Health and Health Policy and French. After graduation, I lived in London for several months before heading back to my home-state of North Carolina to start medical school at the University of North Carolina. At UNC, I had several terrific mentors who nurtured my interest in primary care, social medicine and patient empowerment. My most meaningful experience in medical school was my creating and leading several chronic disease self-management workshops as part of the Schweitzer Fellowship. Early on, I decided that CHA would be the best place to continue my training because of its rigorous clinical training as well as its real dedication to teaching its residents how to best serve the underserved.

In my spare time, I enjoy running, yoga, traveling (especially impromptu road trips) photography, reading outdoors or in a café.

Laura Trueman

Laura Trueman

I grew up in New York and studied English Literature at Brown University. After graduation I spent two years as a Peace Corps rural health volunteer in Zambia. When I returned home, I worked as an HIV case manager at Beth Israel Hospital in New York. This sparked my interest in clinical medicine and the role that physicians can play in improving the health of both individuals and communities. I attended the University of Pennsylvania for medical school and had the opportunity to work at a student clinic that provides free primary care and medications to uninsured and underinsured residents of West Philadelphia. Through this experience I discovered my love of primary care medicine. In my free time I enjoy running, baking, and discovering new places to hike with my dog.

Frances Ue

Frances Ue

Born and raised in Canada, I received an Honors Bachelor of Science from Queen’s University. In 2004, I completed a health and literacy internship at the Shraddha School for Mentally Challenged Children near Varanasi, India. This experience was the starting point of an incredibly meaningful nine years working in the field of international health as a community organizer, public health researcher, and now as a medical professional. I received a Master’s of Public Health from Columbia University in 2008. I have acquired a breadth of clinical experiences by immersing myself in the barriers to accessing health services in Kenya, dental care among the elderly in Harlem, and HIV care in Canada and Sub-Saharan Africa. As a medical student at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, I was awarded an Infectious Diseases Society of America fellowship to train at the HIV Vaccine Trials Unit at Columbia Presbyterian hospital in New York, and the Dr. Tom Dooley Memorial Scholarship to train in infectious diseases at Groote Schuur Hospital in South Africa. I have continued to display a strong commitment to community service as the Lead Coordinator of the free health clinic, the Health Resource Center in Saint Louis. In my spare time, I enjoy running and exploring the social media movement in health.


Second Year Residents

Drew Bunker

Drew Bunker

I was born in Beverly, MA and raised in Topsfield, MA. I attended Masconomet Regional High School and Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, NC, where I majored in Chemistry with a Certificate of Spanish for the Medical Professions. Always wanting to be a primary care physician, I attended Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, LA, where I came in contact with health inequity in an urban setting. My experiences lead me to be intimately involved with the student-run free clinics providing health care to two community health centers, two homeless shelters, and a drug and alcohol rehabilitation home. In addition, I taught sexual education to New Orleans high school students, volunteered with the Tulane Street Medicine Program and worked with the Louisiana Primary Care Association. My interests in medicine include health care delivery in lower socioeconomic areas and minority communities as well as health policy, addiction medicine and health care for homeless individuals. I speak both Portuguese and Spanish.

Martin Kaminski

Martin Kaminski

Born in West Germany to Polish émigré parents before heading to Idaho as an infant, I grew up in Acton, Massachusetts prior to studying at Brandeis University. Then I went full E.U. and studied medicine in Warsaw, Poland and was awarded an Erasmus scholarship to study in Giessen, Germany for a semester. Afterwards, I capitalized on a life-long anglophile dream by undertaking the UK equivalent of IM internship in London at Imperial College London SoM followed by residency at King’s College London SoM.

I returned home to Massachusetts for an Infectious Diseases Fellowship at Tufts Medical Center while simultaneously earning a Diploma in Tropical Medicine & Hygiene through Médecins Sans Frontières UK and the Royal College of Physicians of London.

I elected to undergo a fast-track, second IM residency at CHA so I can stay closer to home in amazing Cambridge-Boston. To me, CHA embraces the best aspects of the UK and USA in one--a commitment that the best possible care should be available to all, regardless of wealth and rigorous focus on education and personal development. Outside of the hospital, you can find me running, erging, writing about medicine, and drinking espresso (and Earl Grey).

Megan Rose LaPorte

Megan Rose LaPorte

I'm the daughter of two nurses, and a proud native of the ever-wacky Portland, Oregon. I graduated from Emmanuel College in 2011 with a degree in biology and a concentration in neuroscience. After college I spent a year in Thailand on a Fulbright grant, teaching English, traveling throughout Southeast Asia, and interning at hospitals in Chiang Mai and the Thai-Burma border. While at Dartmouth for medical school, I was awarded a Schwartz Compassion Fellowship to study compassion in medical pedagogy, carried out a project to support healthcare for stateless individuals on the Thai-Burma border, and was an active member of the Physician for Human Rights Student Advisory Board. I like hiking, yoga, and podcasts and speak fluent English, reasonably good Thai, and tolerable Spanish. As someone who plans to spend my career leveraging medicine and science as tools for social justice, I am absolutely delighted to be joining the team at CHA!

David Lee

David Lee

I was born and raised in Argentina along with my sister and our pet tortoise Marcello. We then left Marcello behind to move to Miami where my family had our first encounter as beneficiaries of the US public healthcare system. 20 years later, I am excited to now have the opportunity to be contributing to the same system that once took care of us.

I went to college at Vanderbilt where I found opportunities to volunteer as an interpreter for free clinics around Nashville and to return to Buenos Aires to work on a murine study of RSV, a pediatric respiratory virus, with Fundación INFANT. In medical school at the University of Illinois-Chicago, I worked on a multi-centered immigrant health hypertension study with the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. I’ve also done clinical rotations at the Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia in Peru, as well as conducted a needs assessment in establishing a GEOHealth hub to monitor environmental health hazards in the Alto Mayo region in the Peruvian Amazon.

I’m looking forward to training at CHA, having a panel of Spanish and Portuguese speaking patients in the Cambridge community and to having an awesome pet tortoise like Marcello again.

Gregory Lines

Gregory Lines

Born and raised in the Boston area, I attended Trinity College (Hartford, CT) where I designed an interdisciplinary major in human rights studies. After graduating, I served in the Peace Corps in Peru where I worked with a local health center to help train community health workers and teach HIV/AIDS prevention to adolescents. Returning to the U.S., I taught middle school Spanish before going back to school myself. I earned an MPH at the John’s Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health where I focused on infectious disease epidemiology and health disparities. My interest in population health led me to medical school at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. In my 3rd and 4th years, I joined the Training in Urban Medicine and Public Health (TRIUMPH) program based in Milwaukee. I had the opportunity to work with a community health center to promote medication adherence among Latino immigrants and help develop a peer support program for people living with HIV/AIDS. I’m excited to return to Massachusetts and continue training among a community dedicated to promoting health equity and caring for the underserved. In my free time I enjoy trekking through the mountains or dropping a fishing line in the ocean or a lake.

Jay Luthar

Jay Luthar

My interest in medicine comes from a deep curiosity about the human condition, a passion for science, and a calling to provide equitable and humanistic care to all people. Although I grew up in Rhode Island, I've spent quite a bit of time in the midwest at UW-Madison for undergrad and the Medical College of Wisconsin for medical school. While in medical school, I was involved in the urban and community health pathway, which helped further my understanding of social determinants of health. In addition to volunteering at our free clinic, I started working on a project wondering if mindfulness practiced by physicians might theoretically reduce implicit bias in interactions with patients. This led to starting a mindfulness elective for my fellow classmates to also cultivate medical student empathy and well-being. Outside of medicine, I have spent some time working on a farm in Hawaii, enjoy listening to all varieties of jazz, blues, funk and rock music and playing the guitar. I have dabbled in making few music videos and short films, enjoy slack lining, practicing yoga, and spending time with my family and partner Sara, especially in nature. I'm thrilled to join the mission of CHA!

Janine Petito

Janine Petito

I grew up in Chappaqua, New York, but have never spotted Hillary Clinton in the woods. For undergrad, I attended Wesleyan University, where I studied biology and science in society, and first recognized the huge impact of social determinants on human health (I also had a lot of fun playing jazz saxophone and learning to draw!). After college, I moved to New York City and did a year of research while searching for ways to explore my passion for social justice and access to medical care. I ultimately landed at Community Health Advocates, where I helped New Yorkers navigate the complexities of health insurance and learned a great deal about the serious inequities that pervade our country’s healthcare system. I moved to Boston in 2013 to start medical school at Boston University—and quickly discovered the superiority of the north side of the river—and have since been committed to fighting for policies that would make our broken healthcare system equitable for all patients. I am extremely excited about working in primary care, and am thrilled to be joining the CHA community! Outside of work, I love to hike and cook, and still enjoy music and art.

Jaeyoung Yang

Jaeyoung Yang

I grew up in a family of three in Atlanta, Georgia. I attended Yale College where I studied economics and international studies, and completed my post-bac studies at Johns Hopkins. During medical school, I had the chance to work for the Iora Health, a Boston-based startup focused on primary care redesign. I hope to supplement my clinical practice with such systems-level work. With my free time, I enjoy working out, drinking iced coffee, and reading history books.


First Year Residents

Shinn-Te Chou

Shinn-Te Chou

I grew up in Seattle and attended the University of Washington (U-Dub) where I studied mathematics and biochemistry. My favorite TV show at the time was House MD, but upon graduating I became an actuary instead, utilizing my mathematical background.

After spending several years working for health and life insurance companies, I realized that my true passion lies in helping people with their health and medical needs. I began volunteering at the Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City before pursuing my medical degree at Chicago Medical School, which gave me the opportunity to connect with people and to learn about patients and their life stories. As a medical student, I volunteered at the student-run clinic which serves the underserved and underinsured in North Chicago and surrounding communities and was surprised by the widening health disparities. I am excited to join CHA which is committed to serving and advocating for those who need it the most. During my leisure time, I enjoy skiing (still learning) and having coffee with friends and family!

John Gaudet

John Gaudet

I grew up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and I am grateful for a childhood that prioritized being outdoors and cooking and eating good food together. I went to college at the University of Georgia where I studied physics. I then attended Yale for medical school, where, by working in a community garden and as a patient navigator, I met role models who taught through example how to make real change in the underlying injustices of our healthcare system. I had the incredible opportunity to then work with these same teachers to build community engagement and amplify patients’ voices as Yale was restructuring its delivery of primary care. I am overjoyed to be part of a like-minded group at CHA where I hope to gain skills in establishing lines of communication within and between communities to help make a more responsive healthcare system. In my free time, I like to play soccer and bake bread (and teach you – yes you – how to do it)!

Byung-Jae Kim

Byung-Jae Kim

Born and raised in Korea, I came to states when I was 18 years old and began modeling. I traveled to many different fashion capitals to walk down runways of New York City, Paris, and Milan and pose for renowned magazines. During this time, I met my soon to be father-in-law and got deeply inspired by his genuine passion and work to help and educate others who are suffering from chronic diseases how to live healthy with lifestyle changes.

I decided to quit modeling and went to Loma Linda University for medical school to pursue my new passion. I came to CHA because of its focus on health of community and underserved people and also opportunity to learn about the health advocacy. Moreover, its small class size was a huge factor for me.

I love to spend time with my 2 kids and wife and enjoy snorkeling and relaxing on the beach!

Ariel Majidi

Ariel Majidi

Growing up in Delaware in a family of engineers, I broke the mold and studied Biochemistry and Global Public Health at the University of Virginia. After graduating, I moved to Pittsburgh, PA and served as an AmeriCorps member at a federally- qualified health center where I connected refugee patients to medical and social services. Through this experience, I discovered the power in primary care partnerships to engage communities and promote health equity. My interest in caring for underserved populations in urban settings led me to Emory University for medical school. There I served as a student coordinator for a local clinic for refugee and immigrant patients and joined the Institute for Healthcare Improvement to apply quality improvement methods to clinic operations. I also worked with medical and mental health providers at the Grady Ponce de Leon Center, a comprehensive medical facility for patients with HIV/AIDS, to research care retention strategies for HIV- positive youth in Atlanta. I am excited to join the Cambridge Health Alliance team to further my passion for providing integrated, patient-centered care to diverse communities and advocating for social justice in medicine. Outside of work, I love reading, exploring the local poetry and arts scene wherever I am, and rock-climbing.

Soumya Narayan

Soumya Narayan

I grew up in Waterloo, Canada, a city south of Toronto, known as the home of the Blackberry phone. For undergrad, I attended the University of Waterloo where I majored in Biomedical Sciences, and also studied English and the Arts. After graduating, my interest in the complexity of the brain led me to pursue neuroscience and psychiatry research at the Johns Hopkin School of Medicine. I worked with patients who had difficult psychiatric disorders and also volunteered with the Baltimore Rescue Mission Clinic to provide free medical care to homeless men. Working with disadvantaged and uninsured populations, with complex medical issues, I became passionate about disease prevention, addressing multiple determinants of health, and creating a more equitable healthcare system. I then pursued an MHS degree at the John Hopkins School of Public Health, where I learned about disease epidemiology and prevention and healthcare policy. In medical school, I furthered my interest in primary care and am excited to join CHA and be part of a community that is committed to social justice within medicine. Outside of medicine, I love to spend time with friends and family, explore local museums and coffee shops, and do anything that involves being creative (and eating!).

Koh-Eun Narm

Koh-Eun Narm

I spent my early childhood in Singapore and South Korea. As a missionary’s daughter, I traveled to India, where I attended a boarding school in the Himalayas and learned to speak English. My personal experiences with numerous infectious diseases in my childhood demonstrated how access to healthcare profoundly impacts underserved communities. When I was in high school, my family immigrated to the U.S. and made California our new home. I received my B.A. in Molecular and Cell Biology from UC Berkeley. I fell in love with Microbiology while working in a research laboratory and continued studying microbes in the U.S. Department of Agriculture for two years after graduation. Combining my passion for medicine and science, I joined the MD/PhD program in University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. My PhD training focused on understanding the gene interaction involved in the regulation of Salmonella pathogenesis in the initial stages of infection as it invades the host epithelium. I am excited to join CHA and become a part of community dedicated to providing healthcare to the underserved. Apart from my academics, I love exploring new places with my family, playing in a string trio with my siblings, and listening to classical music.

Charlotte Rastas

Charlotte Rastas

I am originally from the UK and, despite completing most of my schooling in the US, still feel most at home in the English countryside. I received my undergraduate degree from North Carolina State University where I studied biology before going to medical school at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. There, I became interested in global health and the role that culture plays in shaping healthcare decision making. One of my electives took me to a remote part of the Himalayas where I was able to see firsthand the difficulties associated with providing healthcare in a resource-limited setting. At Chapel Hill I conducted research on the acceptability of HPV self testing as a way to improve access to care for women. My interest in the social determinants of health led me to pursue a master’s degree in medical anthropology at The University of Oxford in the UK. I am thrilled to be joining CHA for my internal medicine training and look forward to being part of a community that is committed to social justice and patient advocacy. In my free time I enjoy spending time with my husband and dog, reading, and riding horses.

Alix Schrager

Alix Schrager

A mid-westerner by origin, I grew up in Ohio. At Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY, I studied English and dance. I then moved to NYC to continue dancing and I became a yoga teacher. This experience brought together my penchant for compassionate teaching as well as my interest in physical and mental health. Prior to beginning my premedical studies in Bennington, VT, I volunteered as a patient advocate in an ED in Brooklyn. Before moving back to Ohio to attend medical school at the University of Cincinnati, I served in Americorps at a community health center in rural Maine. I guided patients through the inaugural year of the Health Insurance Marketplace sign-ups and accessed vital medications for chronic disease management. While in medical school, I worked on behavioral interventions for weight management, school-based health education, and medical student wellness. My interests in medicine are primary care, health literacy, and women's health. I also enjoy spending time outdoors: garden, beach, mountain top, or city street. I am genuinely thrilled to be at CHA, to be serving and learning from a community new to me, and feel lucky to have the support of my family.

    Contact Us

  • Rachel Stark, MD, MPH

    Director, Residency Program in Internal Medicine P: (617) 665-1021 Email

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  • Applications are accepted through the ERAS system

    (Our NRMP code is 1268140M0)