Residents

Chief Residents 2016-2017

Carolyn Koulouris

Carolyn Koulouris

I am a native New Englander having grown up on Cape Cod and just south of Burlington, VT. I attended Amherst College where I studied biology, culminating in my longest consecutive stint outside of New England—living in St. Lucia to study hummingbirds. After college, I worked at Massachusetts General Hospital coordinating research trials for the Gynecological Oncology group. This time was my first taste of living in Cambridge and definitely inspired me to come back to the area.

I traveled back north for medical school at Dartmouth where I devoted much of my extra-curricular efforts to curriculum improvement and re-design at the medical school. I enjoyed many aspects of clinical medicine, but had the most clinical interest in longitudinal care of patients. Increasing my personal involvement in advocacy is of my goals during my time at Cambridge Health Alliance. After residency, I plan to practice primary care and continue to be involved in medical education, but I have not yet decided on a locale. In my free time, I like to cook vegetarian meals, spend time outside, and catch up with my friends.

Galina Tan

Galina Tan

Growing up with my family in Singapore and Texas, I learned the values of hard work, honesty, and mutual respect for others early in life. Becoming a physician therefore seemed like a natural fit for me. I was almost immediately drawn to primary care upon starting medical school, when I became involved with NYU’s student-run free clinic in Manhattan. By providing care to an incredibly diverse population of New York City’s, I quickly appreciated how the flaws in our healthcare system robbed many deserving people of the basic right to good quality health care. My residency training at CHA has prepared me with not only a solid Internal Medicine education, but it has also allowed me to learn from mentors who practice the kind of patient-centered, culturally sensitive medicine that I aspire towards. As a resident, I have participated in curricular development for residents and medical students, led diabetes groups for patients at the Cambridge Primary Care Center, and was a co-investigator in a research study on MA health reform’s impacts on safety net hospitals, which led to an oral and poster presentation at SGIM. During my free time, I enjoy playing tennis, cooking/baking, and taking advantage of the many cultural events that Boston has to offer. I also try to spend as much of my vacation time as possible with my family in Singapore, and have become quite the master of overcoming jet lag! I am thrilled to be able to continue learning and growing as a physician, educator, and leader during my year as co-chief resident in my wonderful CHA home.


Third Year Residents

Alison Alpert

Alison Alpert

Born in Brooklyn to atheist Jews, I learned social justice from their political leanings and their contradictions. I came out at sixteen in response to the homophobic rumblings in the wake of “Don’t Ask. Don’t Tell.” When my student group made posters for National Coming Out Day, I brought them to the vice principal for approval. He questioned our right to put them up, and I realized how unprepared and fearful I was. At Oberlin College and Western Michigan University, I received my Bachelor of Arts and Masters in Fine Arts in creative writing. I also began working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Their willingness to be themselves despite the flak they received impressed and moved me. When I returned to New York, I taught (and was schooled by) low-income young people of color many of whom spoke openly about the violence, individual and systemic, they experienced. With them, I found greater strength to articulate the violence I’d lived through and find ways to interrupt that which they perpetuated on themselves and each other. I left New York to attend the University of Vermont College of Medicine. I hope to become a clinician investigator and bring new skills to the communities that have schooled and cared for me.

Chin Ho Fung

Chin Ho Fung

My family and I moved from Hong Kong to New York City when I was eight. One of the most memorable experiences for me in NYC was the four years I spent in Stuyvesant High School. This is also where I met my fiancée (we are getting married directly before residency)! We then went to Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, which was essentially the first time for both of us to adventure life outside the city. After college, I moved to another rural region known for its harsh winters and studied at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth in Hanover, NH. Not knowing for certain which specialty to choose, I was involved in multiple student interest groups in order to explore my interests. I ultimately became the co-leader of the Internal Medicine Interest Group, Community Service Committee, and the Art for Kids program in which volunteering students work one-on-one with children with chronic illnesses so that they can delve into their artistic sides. I recognized my passion in outpatient care and medical education during my third-year rotations, and I am excited at matching at CHA. For fun, I enjoy ice skating, snowboarding (extreme amateur), swimming, and watching The Food Channel.

Cynthia Schoettler

Cynthia Schoettler

Originally from the wonderful Twin Cities, (St.Paul/Minneapolis, MN), I moved to Mass for undergrad at Brandeis University, majoring in what is best summed up as ‘pre-public health’. I stayed in Boston for a job in clinical research while I applied to public health programs. While getting my MPH at Boston University I worked with the Section of General Internal Medicine at Boston Medical Center. This taught me about health disparities research and how fun and rewarding primary care can be. During this time I realized that being a provider – especially for underserved populations - was where my heart was. I continued at BU for medical school. In medical school I became very involved with our student nutrition group, SNAAC. I love food, and think it is a key determinant of health. To help share my interest, I designed a nutrition counseling module to teach all 4th years at BUSM, it is currently being beta tested. When I have free time, I enjoy spending it with my husband, friends, & family; cooking, traveling, gardening (when I can find a spot of dirt in Boston), and taking pictures.

James Lang

James Lang

Growing up just north of Seattle, Washington, I was embraced by a large family near the green foothills of the Cascade Mountains in a small town called Mill Creek. I attended the University of Washington and graduated with degrees in Biochemistry and Spanish. As a Mary Gates Scholar, I dedicated time to biochemistry research and to volunteering in a bilingual clinic. I also studied for a year in Cadiz, Spain, which solidified my love of culture and language. Volunteering and traveling in South America developed my passion for immigrant and underserved health. After graduating, I worked as a HealthCorps patient navigator at a Community Health Center. During this time I lost my beloved sister from complications from T1 diabetes, which deepened my passion for chronic disease management and inspired me to subsequently become a chronic care coordinator. Shortly after, I began medical school at the University of Washington with a focus on underserved and Hispanic health. I worked on several projects including creating a sustainable, culturally competent chronic care program for rural communities of Central America. In 2012, I was humbled to become a Magnuson Scholar. As a future primary care physician, I sought an academically strong residency program that is dedicated to underserved communities, health advocacy and collegiality. Cambridge Health Alliance combines all of these attributes harmoniously. Since starting residency, I have worked on several projects including diabetes care management quality improvement as well as naloxone education and dispensing in the outpatient setting. I also recently presented at SGIM on Meningitis Retention Syndrome. I am excited to continue working on new projects this year, especially involving advocacy. I continue to be inspired by my patients, colleagues and mentors and look forward to staying on as co-chief next year. Aside from my academic pursuits, I enjoy running, skiing, surfing, singing, painting and playing the piano.

Jyothi Ravindra

Jyothi Ravindra

I grew up in Natick, Massachusetts and attended Dartmouth College, where I studied educational psychology and government. After college, I moved back to the Boston area, to Dorchester, to teach GED classes at a non-profit called Project Hope. I fell in love with teaching, but I also got to participate in some really exciting health and wellness initiatives, and I eventually realized that I wanted to be more directly involved in community health. After 5 years teaching, I had the opportunity to spend a year working at Codman Square Health Center. It was inspiring to see the sort of impact an innovative community health center could make in promoting the health of both individual patients and the community as a whole. At both Project Hope and Codman, I saw the importance of patient education, doctor-patient communication, community outreach, and disease prevention in addressing health disparities. I went back up to Dartmouth to attend medical school, where my belief in the importance of primary care and health systems continued to grow. I’m so excited to be returning to the Boston area and to be joining the CHA community! In my free time, I enjoy trail running, cooking (especially making and eating salsa and guacamole), and hanging out with friends.

Maria Nardell

Maria Nardell

I grew up in an Italian American family in Newton, MA and came across the river for college at Harvard, where I studied sociology, history and economics with research focusing on the experiences of immigrant groups in the U.S. Outside of class, I was active in the dance community and also loved time with CityStep (teaching dance to public school kids), Kuumba (singing music from the African diaspora), and a summer spent teaching in a rural village in Namibia. For three years after graduation, I worked in New York City doing consulting and research for nonprofits and philanthropies before deciding I wanted to pursue medicine, inspired by interests in socioeconomic determinants of disease and global health. While at Yale for medical school, I developed additional interests in women’s health, medical ethics and nutrition, culminating in a study on the nutritional status of pediatric inpatients and their caregivers at a teaching hospital in Kigali, Rwanda. I also enjoyed working at a free clinic in San Francisco and at a rural clinic outside of Bogota, Colombia. I look forward to an academic career in clinical care, research and advocacy with an emphasis on healthcare disparities and delivery both at home and abroad. When I’m not in the hospital, I enjoy dancing, hiking, travel, and writing.

Michael McShane

Michael McShane

I grew up near Dayton, Ohio. While studying Pre-Medicine at Penn State University, I served as a peer educator and counselor at the student health center. After graduation, I traveled a few hours down the road to Hershey, Pennsylvania for medical school at the Penn State College of Medicine. At Hershey, I became interested in how people learn about quality and patient safety and founded an interprofessional group for students in health policy, nursing, medicine, and industrial engineering. Between my second and third year of medical school, I earned a Masters in Education at Harvard University, focusing my studies on learning theory and curriculum design. During my fourth year of medical school, I had the opportunity to continue exploring my interests in medical education by serving a one-year appointment on the Liaison Committee for Medical Education, the accrediting body of allopathic medical schools in the United States and Canada. I am very excited to continue my training at Cambridge Health Alliance with its commitment to community health and academic excellence! In my free time, I am an avid sports fan, especially when it comes to baseball and college football.

Nihan Cannon

Nihan Cannon

Born in Ankara, Turkey, I moved thirteen times by the time I turned thirteen-- and this sparked my fascination with medicine and community/global health. My family eventually settled down in Virginia, where I attended the College of William and Mary. Here, I explored the cultural, political and socioeconomic dimensions of healthcare and medical knowledge through a double major in Medical Sociology and Neuroscience. My sophomore year, I applied to the joint BS/MD program at EVMS, effectively extending my time in Virginia. While at medical school, I held leadership positions in the Institute for Health Care Improvement, the Honor Council, and Medical Explorers. Also, I developed a burgeoning love for geriatrics through Beyond Clinic Walls, a program that helps marginalized seniors maintain their independence and quality of life via student coordinated home visits. I'm now excited to move one more time, since it means I'll be at CHA. In my free time, I practice Tae Kwon Do, take meandering strolls, and cook fusion cuisine. I can sometimes be found steering my fiancé away from Bernese mountain dogs.


Second Year Residents

Erica Dwyer

Erica Dwyer

I was born in Indiana, but grew up in Austria and Germany. At age 18 I came to Massachusetts to study biology and chemistry at Williams College. There, I joined the Student Global AIDS Campaign and became passionate about AIDS treatment activism. After a life-changing summer working with HIV positive activists in Khayelitsha, South Africa, I obtained a Fulbright Fellowship to spend a year in Durban, South Africa to participate in HIV research and care. I learned about the transformative nature of HIV medication and the struggles patients and providers experience when navigating complex medical systems. I also gained an up-close understanding of the politics surrounding global health research and funding. I returned to the US to complete an MD/PhD at the University of Pennsylvania. For my PhD in the History and Sociology of Science I investigated the discovery and social implications of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in South Africa. My experiences with health care on three continents have taught me the value of excellent primary care and the importance of health care providers working together with patients to make sure they are able to access the care they need. I'm excited that in CHA I found a residency program that shares these values. In my free time, I enjoy classical music, busy coffee shops, and exploring the Boston area with my daughter and husband.

Kay Negishi

Kay Negishi

I was born in New York City and spent most of my childhood there. Growing up as an only child meant playing single-person Monopoly and me-vs-me competitions in Spit, but I was blessed to have the opportunity to frequently visit my family in Japan, whom I am very close with. I ventured into Cambridge for the first time as an undergraduate at Harvard, and then shipped myself off to San Francisco to work in consulting for a few years. During the year before medical school, I lived in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, working with the Haitian Ministry of Health, and then spent four years in Philadelphia going to medical school at the University of Pennsylvania. I suspect that jumping back and forth across the Pacific from infancy and being raised in a bicultural environment sparked my interest in working in a global setting. Over the years, I became increasingly passionate about health, and the puzzle pieces fell together when I discovered global health, and more specifically, caring for the underserved -- which is why I am so thrilled to be joining the CHA family. Outside of work, you can probably find me running in all four seasons, trying to play the guitar, and convincing my friends to dance (badly) with me.

Krupa Parikh

Krupa Parikh

I was born in India and immigrated to the U.S. with my family as a toddler and settled in Cincinnati, Ohio. I attended The Ohio State University and studied Molecular Genetics and Dance. After graduating, I moved back to Cincinnati and volunteered with AmeriCorps VISTA, where I trained community agencies to help people access public benefits. Further, I learned of the barriers that impact the financial, mental, and physical health of the community members. After volunteering for VISTA, I started medical school at Wright State University where, through my interactions with the local community and my work with a community in Mumbai, India, I developed a strong interest in understanding the social and systemic aspects of health. I sought to do residency at a place that emphasizes learning from patients and understanding the patients' needs in an appropriate cultural and social context. I had the opportunity to rotate at Cambridge Health Alliance during medical school and I'm confident it is a place where I will fulfill my pursuits and also be supported by compassionate people. I’m really fortunate and excited to be spending the next three years at CHA! Aside from medicine, I enjoy jogging, trying new recipes, and learning Indian Classical Dance!

Lauren Campbell

Lauren Campbell

I grew up in beautiful Seattle, Washington, studied Biological sciences, Psychology and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, returned to Seattle to pursue a Medical Degree and a Master’s of Public Health at the University of Washington (UW), and am now following my little brother to Boston where I will be joining the wonderful community of healthcare workers at Cambridge Health Alliance. As service vice president of the co-ed national service fraternity at CMU, I had the opportunity to organize over forty service projects. Seeing the passion, pride, and commitment of people working within empowered communities within and around Pittsburgh cultivated my interest in community outreach and advocacy. In medical school, this interest continued to grow when I had the opportunity to collaborate with medical students, community groups, and Seattle Public Health to begin offering free HIV testing and counseling in the community. As my ultimate goal is to work as a primary care physician, clinical educator, and community advocate, I am excited to join a program that combines an academically rigorous curriculum with a commitment to serving underserved communities. Outside of the hospital, I enjoy playing almost any sport, exploring the outdoors, traveling the world, and spending time with friends and family.

Lenore Azaroff

Lenore Azaroff

I grew up in gorgeous Northeastern Connecticut and studied molecular biology at Princeton before deciding that pure lab science was not for me. I worked for a while in human rights research before studying environmental health at the Harvard School of Public Health. I was active in the Cambridge-El Salvador Sister City Project during the Central American wars and did my doctoral research on children's exposure to pesticides in rural El Salvador, in collaboration with a Salvadoran organization promoting organic agriculture. This led to years of occupational health research based at UMass-Lowell, concentrating on the cleaning and construction industries - as well as committed membership in CSAs (community-supported agriculture organic veggie co-ops). Years ago I had the privilege of working as a medical interpreter at Cambridge Hospital and fell in love with the place, so coming here for residency after med school at Case Western is a real return home. In my free time, I enjoy hiking, jogging, reading, and petting my elderly cats.

Nicole Mushero

Nicole Mushero

I grew up in Norwich, CT and moved to Massachusetts to attend Boston University for college. Following that, I obtained my Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Brandeis University. Over the course of my graduate work I came to realize that the lab was not where I wanted to be spending my time and that I really wanted to interact with people in a meaningful and direct way and decided to make the switch to medicine. I attended UMass Medical School and during third year was inspired by an amazing resident to pursue Internal Medicine because of the impression I could see him make on patients’ life and care. I realized, though, that I wanted the continuity of care in patient relationships that primary care provided. My interests within primary care include women’s health, healthcare disparities and geriatrics and I look forward to figuring out which avenues I will pursue. Another passion of mine is the use of reflective writing in medicine as a tool of learning and professional development and I look forward to being part of a community where such pursuits are valued. Outside of medicine, I enjoy spending time with my wife gardening, baking, and reading for pleasure.

Sarah Stoneking

Sarah Stoneking

I grew up in Greensboro, NC, with three fabulous sisters. I attended UNC-Chapel Hill for college, where I studied Chemistry, Music, and Anthropology. While in Chapel Hill, I became involved with The Jackson Center for Saving and Making History, a collective of neighbors, students, and friends who listened, through oral histories and time spent together, to the wisdom and concerns of the long-time residents of the historic Northside community of Chapel Hill. Through my time working with The Jackson Center, I became interested in oral histories as the grounding for community activism. I then moved to Memphis, TN, where I worked for The Church Health Center, a faith-based community health center. Both at The Jackson Center and The Church Health Center, I got the chance to see how incredible communities of care were founded and formed by the communities themselves. I returned to UNC for medical school, where I continued to fall in love with primary care and general medicine as a powerful means to work with the communities we live in. I am so pumped to be at CHA for the coming years and to be with a group of folks dedicated to rigorous academic medicine that prioritizes thoughtful care for the underserved. In my spare time, I enjoy spending time with my partner Will, my aforementioned fabulous sisters and friends, running and hiking, reading, and playing music.

Sonja Skljarevski

Sonja Skljarevski

My family is originally from Bosnia, however after the war started in the early nineties, we immigrated to Canada. Following my father's career, a few years later, we ended up moving to Vermont, and afterwards Indiana. I have memories of growing up in all of these places, and somehow every one of them still feels like home. I attended college at Indiana University and initially thought I would end up pursuing a career in chemistry. However, after 4 years of laboratory research, I was ready for a career with more of a connection to people and their life stories. This led me to pursue medical school at Northwestern University where I realized I was most excited about primary care, and particularly geriatric medicine. Perhaps it is because I was raised by my grandparents, but I now find myself fascinated by the cultural differences in caring for the elderly and how we approach aging. As for time aside from work, I am mostly enjoying the outdoors, exploring new areas, and doing art projects as they come up.


First Year Residents

Deborah Lee

Deborah Lee

I grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and Seoul, Korea. Initially, it was the meaningful relationships I gained while volunteering in a nursing home that attracted me to medicine. It moved me to see how individuals and families from all walks of life shared common vulnerabilities when their health and social circumstances led them to this setting. More importantly, these elders challenged me to learn more about the various medical and social factors that shape their lives at this stage. I attended Brown University for both college and medical school, as part of the Program in Liberal Medical Education. At Brown, I was blessed with incredible mentors in aging research, particularly regarding costs and quality of hospice care. At Brown, I also had the opportunity to interact with the diverse refugee populations in Rhode Island. At CHA, I hope to further grow in my clinical interests in both geriatrics and refugee health. I’m so grateful to train at CHA, where I’ll be surrounded by many role models - people I want to be when I (further) grow up! I love foreign languages, classical and worship music, independent films, and spending time with my loving family.

Frances Ue

Frances Ue

Born and raised in Canada, I received an Honors Bachelor of Science from Queen’s University. In 2004, I completed a health and literacy internship at the Shraddha School for Mentally Challenged Children near Varanasi, India. This experience was the starting point of an incredibly meaningful nine years working in the field of international health as a community organizer, public health researcher, and now as a medical professional. I received a Master’s of Public Health from Columbia University in 2008. I have acquired a breadth of clinical experiences by immersing myself in the barriers to accessing health services in Kenya, dental care among the elderly in Harlem, and HIV care in Canada and Sub-Saharan Africa. As a medical student at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, I was awarded an Infectious Diseases Society of America fellowship to train at the HIV Vaccine Trials Unit at Columbia Presbyterian hospital in New York, and the Dr. Tom Dooley Memorial Scholarship to train in infectious diseases at Groote Schuur Hospital in South Africa. I have continued to display a strong commitment to community service as the Lead Coordinator of the free health clinic, the Health Resource Center in Saint Louis. In my spare time, I enjoy running and exploring the social media movement in health.

Gina Kim

Gina Kim

I grew up in sunny, Los Angeles, CA and moved to NYC to attend Columbia where I studied Neuroscience and Behavior. After college, I worked as a case manager for a welfare-to-work program, connecting individuals with resources to help overcome health and socioeconomic barriers. As a result of this work, I became interested in health disparities and wanted to gain more insight into the challenges of healthcare delivery for underserved populations, which led me to study health policy at the Mailman School of Public Health. For the next few years after graduate school, I worked at the Greater NY Hospital Association within the quality and patient safety department, managing various projects on perinatal safety and hospital-acquired infections. Inspired by the clinical experts I worked with at GNYHA, I eventually attended Albert Einstein College of Medicine. While at Einstein, I had amazing opportunities to volunteer in a public clinic in Cusco, Peru and a district hospital in Kisoro, Uganda, which confirmed my interests in providing care to and working with vulnerable populations. I hope to continue this work both within the local community and abroad, particularly focusing on access-to-care issues and quality. In my free time, I enjoy spending time with my husband and our English bulldog, Winston (meaning, mostly eating). I also enjoy cooking, reading in cafes, playing sports, hiking, and traveling.

Kira Mengistu

Kira Mengistu

Having spent my early years in Belarus and Ethiopia, my parents and I immigrated to the United States when I was in grade school. I attended Harvard for college, where I studied Human Evolutionary Biology, Global Health and Health Policy and French. After graduation, I lived in London for several months before heading back to my home-state of North Carolina to start medical school at the University of North Carolina. At UNC, I had several terrific mentors who nurtured my interest in primary care, social medicine and patient empowerment. My most meaningful experience in medical school was my creating and leading several chronic disease self-management workshops as part of the Schweitzer Fellowship. Early on, I decided that CHA would be the best place to continue my training because of its rigorous clinical training as well as its real dedication to teaching its residents how to best serve the underserved.

In my spare time, I enjoy running, yoga, traveling (especially impromptu road trips) photography, reading outdoors or in a café.

Laura Trueman

Laura Trueman

I grew up in New York and studied English Literature at Brown University. After graduation I spent two years as a Peace Corps rural health volunteer in Zambia. When I returned home, I worked as an HIV case manager at Beth Israel Hospital in New York. This sparked my interest in clinical medicine and the role that physicians can play in improving the health of both individuals and communities. I attended the University of Pennsylvania for medical school and had the opportunity to work at a student clinic that provides free primary care and medications to uninsured and underinsured residents of West Philadelphia. Through this experience I discovered my love of primary care medicine. In my free time I enjoy running, baking, and discovering new places to hike with my dog.

Lynn Anderson

Lynn Anderson

I was born and raised in Alaska, the oldest of five, and am now the proud aunt of six. I attended Brigham Young University where I studied physiology and music. When I took a break to serve a mission for my church in the Bay Area and learned Spanish, I fell in love with the language and the diverse culture and people. I eventually found myself working as a Spanish medical interpreter with Intermountain Healthcare, which attuned me to gaps in understanding between physicians and patients, and to my potential in patient advocacy, particularly through continuity and collaboration. I also learned, through working at a volunteer clinic in Provo, Utah, how gaps in access were being addressed by a collaboration of local government, church, and community resources. I then attended the University of Washington School of Medicine, where my interest in primary care blossomed as a passion, particularly in working with immigrant and homeless populations. I was thrilled to discover this same deep-seated commitment to the underserved at CHA, and I am delighted to be joining the ranks. I love biking, hiking, watercolor, eating out, aunt-time over facetime, and making people cringe when I say: “the more snow the better.”

Shirin Karimi

Shirin Karimi

Originally from Madison, Connecticut, I got to experience a dynamic college experience as a Literature major at American University in Washington D.C. I served as an editor for BleakHouse Publishing, a press dedicated to using the arts to showcase the humanity overlooked in the incarcerated population. As a volunteer in a pediatric cancer ward, I was intrigued by the sentiments of cancer patients and their caregivers, whose descriptions of isolation in the hospital echoed the loss of identity and entrapment within a prison cell. From this experience, I was fortunate to publish an original book of poetry, taking on the voices of those imprisoned in the justice system and in the shackles of illness. I returned to my home state to attend the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, and delved into my passion for the medical humanities through the Arnold P. Gold Humanism Honor Society, research in cancer screening and immunotherapy, and serving the homeless population of Hartford as a member of the Board of our school-run medical clinic. Outside of school, I love traveling, art exhibits and theater, and exploring a new city with friends. I’m thrilled to join my future colleagues at CHA who are dedicated to using medicine as an avenue for social justice.

Vikas Gampa

Vikas Gampa

I was born in India, but grew up primarily in New Zealand and the most exotic Dayton, Ohio. I attended The Ohio State University, where I majored in Philosophy and Molecular Genetics. Following college, I volunteered through AmeriCorps VISTA at a pediatric ID clinic in the Bronx and I partnered with incredible community members to improve HIV research protocols. At Harvard Medical School, I explored ethical concepts of trust and patient autonomy among residents in a public hospital in Mumbai, with the intention to identify barriers to patient autonomy. After third year, I moved to New Mexico to work with Navajo community members on research training and to conduct qualitative research on community health worker-patient relationships. While on Navajo, I also worked with a group of dedicated activists and was inspired by the community’s resiliency. I understood the importance of primary care in improving the health of indigenous and underserved communities. At CHA, I look forward to working with a community dedicated to providing care to the underserved.

I enjoy cooking (and eating) large meals, riding my bike, and dancing with my partner, Krupa!

    Contact Us

  • Richard J. Pels, MD

    Director, Internal Medicine Residency Program; Interim Chief of Medicine P: (617) 665-1021 Email

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    (Our NRMP code is 1268140M0)